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St. Joseph's Catholic Primary School

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Catholic Academy Trust
At St. Joseph’s we live, love and learn by the example of Jesus

At St. Joseph’s we live, love and learn by the example of Jesus

Wellbeing

Wellbeing at St Joseph's

 

Wellbeing is key to children learning successfully. An opportunity to talk to share ,to just be understood will allow learning to take place. At St Joseph's we take the time to listen and support every child's wellbeing. This can be different everyday but our children know that adults listen and support .We have many opportunities to ensure wellbeing can be supported. That could be through;

  • Self check in 
  • Group support
  • Wellbeing groups
  • Mindful minute
  • Mindful colouring/sessions
  • 1-1 sessions (Mrs Bonsignore / counsellor)
  • Draw & Talk
  • Sand play
  • Nurture - Squirrels 
  • After school clubs 

 

Drawing and Talking


At times it is very difficult for us as adults and children to express ourselves through conversation. Drawing and Talking is an amazing intervention which you can share with your children.


You will need a plain piece of paper and a pencil ideally no colour pencils, you allow your child to draw whatever they like to draw, you can prompt them for ideas but remember it’s their internal world/subconscious they will be drawing.
Try not to talk to them whilst they are drawing to allow them to truly express themselves. The session should last 30 minutes, once your son/daughter has finished you start to talk to them about their drawing and not directly about them.


It is extremely important that you do not assume this is how they are actually feeling, however be mindful if you can see through their body language at home they are feeling anxious their drawing can express there sub conscious mind and inner anxieties.


Examples of Questions to help you if they draw the following:

 

House:
Does anyone live in the house?
Do they live on their own?
Do they have a mum and dad? (if not what happened?) now this can show you what they are worried about,
Do they have any pets?
Has anyone ever tried to hurt the house?
What are the people doing?
Are there any neighbours and what are they like?
If the house/people in it had a wish, what would it be?

 

Tree:
Does the tree have any fruit or berries?
Are they good to eat? Does anyone eat them?
Do animals live in the tree? ( now your child could be an animal so they are indirectly in the picture or show you as a family of animals),
How does the tree feel about that?
Are there any other trees nearby ( again this could be your street but they have draw it as a forest through their sub conscious mind)
Has anyone ever tried to hurt the tree?
If the tree had a wish what would it be?

 

Person:
Where does this person live? (they may use a name you know or may not)
What is their favourite thing to do?
Do they have any friends or pets?
Do they have a brother/sister/mum/dad?
Who do they taolk to when things are not going well?
If they had a wish what would it be?

 

General pictures:
Does the picture tell a story?
Can you tell me what’s happening in the picture?
Does the picture have a title?
What happened before?
What happened next?

 

Please during these conversations sometimes things can be expressed that you never knew how your child was feeling therefore be mindful of past traumas or situations they may have experienced which may now come out in conversations with you.
 


Sand Play

What is Sand play?
Sand play: is a nonverbal, therapeutic intervention that makes use of a sandbox, toy figures, and sometimes water, to create scenes of miniature worlds that reflect a person’s inner thoughts, struggles, and concerns.
Sand play is a technique which can be used to facilitate healing in adults, adolescents, and children, allowing them to express their thoughts and feelings when words alone are not enough. In addition to its therapeutic use, sand tray can be a tool for personal growth and the development of creativity.
Sand play focus on the unconscious and seek to provide a free, protected space and the opportunity to communicate non-verbally.
If you have the resources this is another way children can express their thoughts and feelings if they are struggling with their anxieties and worries.

 

Policy 

Resources

Mindfulness

Wellbeing Resources for Parents and Children during the Covid 19 Pandemic

 

 

As times are so hard for us all to comprehend in this Surreal World we are currently living in and the experiences both us as educators/parents and our children are going through, please find listed below some resources to help you and your children with your and their emotional wellbeing.

 

Websites:
To support Wellbeing and Anxiety:

Bereavement:

Coronavirus Social Stories:

Apps for phones:

 

• Mindfulness
• Mind shift
• Mood track
• Calm

 

Resources/ support for home learning to eliminate stress and anxiety:
Support with a Timetable and planning:

Visual timetables:

 

Many children don’t take information in well when they listen. This includes instructions, information and explanations. Many schools use visual timetables which help children build routines. These are helpful for anxious children, those with low motivation, those with Autism, sensory processing difficulties, speech communication and language difficulties and those with sequencing difficulties.
The visual timetable should be used to show your routine clearly. You can identify what the current activity is, and what the next one will be. If possible, involve your child in making the visual timetable, either by:

 

• drawing
• selecting picture from online
• taking or selecting photographs.

 

The visual timetables can be stored on the computer and shown when needed.
Many children don’t take information in well when they listen. This includes instructions, information and explanations. Many schools use visual timetables which help children build routines.

 

These are helpful for anxious children, those with low motivation, those with Autism, sensory processing difficulties, speech communication and language difficulties and those with sequencing difficulties.

 

The visual timetable should be used to show your routine clearly. You can identify what the current activity is, and what the next one will be. If possible, involve your child in making the visual timetable, either by:


• drawing
• selecting picture from online
• taking or selecting photographs.
• The visual timetables can be stored on the computer and shown when needed.

 

One of the most powerful resources at your fingertips is your child/children. Ask them how the family can make things work. Questions might include:
What is the best way for me to help you?
• How can we make a space for you to learn best?
• What are we doing?
• What can we improve?

 

Children are great problem solvers. Involving them in the required steps such as designing the workspace and creating the visual resources can help then feel secure involved and motivated.
This can work in ‘micro steps’ for children who are hard to motivate. Working together on preparing the materials needed for a lesson and getting the space set up can help. In school, children are learning in groups, so doing computer-based work yourself alongside them can show solidarity.
Think Dr Amelia Roberts UCL Centre for Inclusive Education March 2020 @CIE_IOE https://www.letsthink.org.uk/

 

Community:

Ensure regular contact online with friends and family for you and your children. Community is vital to support all of us through this challenging time.

 

• Include similar break times and meal-times (if possible and/or appropriate)
• Work with your child (see below) to replicate school. This can be made fun and playful, such as using a bell or timer to signify lesson end or time for a break. You might invent a variety of ways to ‘schoolify’ your home and your child might enjoy coming up with ideas.
• Work with your child to create a ‘school space’. If space is limited, identify a ‘school’ chair or ‘school space’ to replicate the physical environment where learning takes place.
• You may need to practice new routines (see visual timetables below)
• Find ways for you and your child to use technology to meet up with others.
• This is a useful video about designing a work space for children who are easily distracted:
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bsGrd1RCys

 

Think about: some of our children find it very difficult to process everything around them below are some ideas to help support your children whilst they are working from home.

 

• Sensory processing – what can we remove/what can we add?
• Visual Time-tables
• Structured ways to de-stress
• Quiet spaces to learn
• Ways to maintain exercise

 

Other useful links